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Winter Semester 2022

BYU's plan for a traditional winter semester with adjustments for the health and safety of the campus community during the pandemic.

Latest Updates

19 January 2022— COVID-19 Event Testing Locations
Students, faculty, staff and campus guests who are seeking COVID-19 testing as an alternative requirement to attend a BYU event can obtain testing at a BYU event testing site. These event testing sites will operate on a first-come, first-served basis (appointments not required). The same test may be used for multiple BYU events as long as the events start within 72 hours of the test result.

  • Marriott Center
    On-site COVID-19 testing will begin three hours prior to the start of BYU Men’s Basketball games and end 30 minutes after the game has started. On-site testing may be available for other large Marriott Center events; please contact the BYU Ticket Office at byutickets@byu.edu for event-specific availability.
  • Alternate Event Testing Site
    M–F, 3–5 p.m.
    1151 Wilkinson Student Center (formerly The Wall at BYU)

These event testing sites are exclusively for non-symptomatic patrons who will be attending large, indoor public events on campus (athletics, performing arts, conferences and symposiums) and for employees working at the events. State of Utah officials have asked that individuals NOT seek event testing at any of the Test Utah sites.

As a reminder, guests under the age of 12 will be permitted to enter the venue without showing proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test.

Testing for Symptomatic Individuals
Patrons experiencing symptoms of illness should not attend BYU events. Symptomatic individuals seeking a COVID-19 test can be tested at the Test Utah site in the west parking lot of LaVell Edwards Stadium. Symptomatic BYU students, staff, faculty and dependents may also be tested at the BYU Student Health Center.


10 January 2022—BYU is closely monitoring the rising number of COVID-19 cases on a local and national level. As part of its efforts to help slow the spread of disease within the campus community, BYU is continuing the following processes:

Additionally, starting Jan. 20, 2022, BYU will be requiring attendees of large, indoor public events on campus (athletics, performing arts, conferences and symposiums) to present proof of full vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test to gain access to the event venue.

Proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test may be required at any public event, but generally will be required at public events with more than 100 attendees.

For more information about the new public event requirements, visit the Events & Activities page.

“The safety of our students, faculty, staff and campus guests remains the top priority at BYU,” said President Kevin J Worthen. “These policies will enable us to continue to gather together and share a homecourt advantage, live music, theatre and dance experiences while fulfilling part of our university mission to reflect a loving, genuine concern for the welfare of our neighbor.”


BYU strongly urges students, employees and campus guests to follow recent counsel from the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to get vaccinated and wear masks in public gatherings whenever social distancing is not possible.

Per the CDC, individuals who come into direct, close contact with a positive case of COVID-19 are currently not required to quarantine, unless symptoms develop, if they have done one of the following:

  • Received a booster dose
  • Received a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine within the last 6 months
  • Received a Johnson & Johnson vaccine within the last 2 months

Per Utah Department of Health, people who are symptomatic do not need to seek out testing and instead should isolate at home for five days. They should then wear a mask for at least five more days. Testing is still recommended in certain situations.

Questions? Contact the BYU COVID-19 Hotline at 801-422-7662 or email casemanagement@byu.edu

Winter Semester 2022

January 1–April 22, 2022

(data as of Jan 23)

Winter Semester Cases Percentage of Campus Community
Active cases 327 <1%
Cases no longer in isolation 2,121

Active cases include individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19 during winter semester 2022 (January 1–April 22) and are currently in isolation. The number of reported cases includes students, faculty and staff who tested positive while either working at BYU and have been physically present in the local campus community. There are 39,445 people physically present in the campus community during winter semester 2022.

Winter Semester
Cases Percentage of Campus Community
Total cases 2,448 6.2%
Seven-day rolling average of new cases 85

Weekly Summary Daily Average Weekly Total
Week 1 (1/1–1/7) 91 638
Week 2 (1/8–1/14) 136 954
Week 3
(1/15–1/21)
93 651

Note: There may be small differences in the Weekly Summary chart as BYU continues to receive additional information. Reported cases may be counted in a different semester or term based on testing date.

This data is based on the number of cases reported to BYU each week from a variety of sources including self-reporting, the BYU Student Health Center, and focused, risk-based testing.

Chart comparing of daily reported new cases of COVID-19 between 2020 and 2021 academic years

Total number of reported cases during winter break 2021 (68), fall semester 2021 (855), summer break 2021 (35), summer term 2021 (63), spring term 2021 (39), winter semester 2021 (1,185), winter break 2020 (317), fall semester 2020 (3,634), summer term 2020 (166), spring term 2020 (16) and winter semester 2020 (21): 6,399.

Campus Vaccination Rates for Winter Semester 2022

Data as of Jan 18 (updated weekly)

Chart depicting number of vaccinations within the BYU community

We ask the BYU campus community to help us track the spread of COVID-19. If you have tested positive for the virus or are awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test, please fill out this form.

COVID-19 Self-Reporting Form

This information will help us to reduce the spread of the disease.